Give Us A King

Give Us A King by Kirk Hunt

But the thing displeased Samuel when they said, “Give us a king to judge us.” So Samuel prayed to the Lord. And the Lord said to Samuel, “Heed the voice of the people in all that they say to you; for they have not rejected you, but they have rejected Me, that I should not reign over them.

1 Samuel 8: 6-8 NKJV

The people of Israel demanded a king. They rejected the perfection of Jehovah-Jireh. In His place, they wanted an imperfect, fallible man.

Samuel tried to explain the error of their request. A king would demand taxes, force labor, take military conscripts and seize property and lands. Still, they answered, “We want a king like the other nations.”

God’s people, Christian disciples, are not like “other nations.” We are supposed to operate through the Holy Spirit. Our greatest power is supposed to be the love we receive from God and share with others.

For too long, too many have sought to make Christianity just another secular power group. When Christians seek mere political or financial power, we debase ourselves and reflect poorly on Father-God. God’s people should operate on a higher level.

I pray that Christians will return to God and operate in His power. After the revival in the Church, the nations will listen. Our great impact and influence in the world will flow from His power, not ours.

Like ancient Israel, modern Christians have rejected God and chosen a lesser path. It is not too late. Return to Him and wield the great power of His love in your heart and theirs.

Think: I want Father-God to reign over me, not some fallible man or woman.

Pray: “Lord, I bend my knee and heart to You alone.”

Copyright © February 2021, Kirk Hunt

This devotional is brought to you courtesy of CadreMen Press. You can purchase a copy of Blessed and Blessing: Devotionals For Gospel Champions from your favorite bookseller or directly from CadreMen Press.

Mourning The Rejected

Mourning The Rejected By Kirk Hunt

Now the Lord said to Samuel, “How long will you mourn for Saul, seeing I have rejected him from reigning over Israel? Fill your horn with oil, and go; I am sending you to Jesse the Bethlehemite. For I have provided Myself a king among his sons.”

1 Samuel 16:1 NKJV

At first, King Saul had been God’s man, in and through character, anointing and appointment.  Even before sparing King Agag, Saul, son of Tish, had become rejected by God.  Samuel grieved for the loss.

Saul chose to be rejected.  It came one act of pride, arrogance or disobedience at a time.  All too soon after his coronation, Saul decided he did not need to obey God or continue following His law.

Godly men and women rarely fall all at one.  You just suddenly notice.  Like David, Saul likely had multiple opportunities to repent and recover.  Thick, thin, bright or dim, the king crossed a final line in God’s judgment and divine rejection.. 

God is a God of mercy and grace.  He is also a God judgment and justice.  Seek Him while He can be found. 

God ordered Samuel to his feet and sent him to anoint the next king of Israel.  Saul could have stayed close to God’s heart and purpose.  Instead, he chose to reject God’s plan for himself and the nation.  His choice became a tragedy for him and the nation.

Please do not confuse God’s love and mercy for indulgence.  Your anointing can be lost.  Your appointment can be forfeited.

It may not be “just one more thing.”  It may be “the final straw.”  Seek God now and seek His continuing acceptance. 

Think:       What path am I choosing and why?

Pray:         “Help me to stay worthy of Your acceptance and approval.”

 

Copyright © August 2018, Kirk Hunt

This devotional is brought to you courtesy of CadreMen Press.  You can purchase a copy of Blessed and Blessing: Devotionals For Gospel Champions from your favorite bookseller or directly from CadreMen Press.

After Admonition

After Admonition By Kirk Hunt

Reject a divisive man after the first and second admonition,   knowing that such a person is warped and sinning, being self-condemned.

Titus 3:10-11 NKJV

Admonition can be defined as authoritative counsel or warning.  Nathan’s confrontation of David (2 Samuel 12:1-15) is a definitive example of how to correct even a powerful leader.  Just as important, even the powerful should respond correctly to truth-speakers.  Paul, speaking to Titus, plainly states there are limits to the effort to help men and women who are in error.

David’s Israel was wealthy and militarily powerful.  Still, Nathan appeared in David’s throne room and rebuked him for his sin and error.  Success or good performance in one area of your life is not an excuse for sin anywhere in your life.

David, thankfully, had the wisdom and imperfect righteousness enough to respond with confession and repentance.  No one is so perfectly righteous, or extraordinarily wise, that they never need authoritative counsel or warning.  With all of his power and authority, King David meekly and obediently accepted Nathan’s rebuke.  David then patiently endured his (painful) process of repentance and restoration.

Christian men and women do not give up on someone the first (or second) time it gets hard.  On the other hand, Jesus Himself said, “Go and sin no more.”  Grace is not a “continue to sin” card.

Titus, on Crete, led folk who tended to go their own way, instead of following God’s path.  Paul the Apostle provided clear instructions on how to handle divisive men and women.  Sooner or later you will give the rebukes, or take the rebukes.  How will you act in that day?

Think:        After being admonished, do I, or others, sincerely seek to make a change?

Pray:           “Lord, help me accept admonishment as one of Your righteous men or women.”

 

Copyright © August 2017, Kirk Hunt

This devotional is brought to you courtesy of CadreMen Press.  You can purchase a copy of Blessed and Blessing: Devotionals For Gospel Champions from your favorite bookseller or directly from CadreMen Press.