Calm Your Storm

Calm Your Storm by Kirk Hunt

Therefore they cried out to the Lord and said, “We pray, O Lord, please do not let us perish for this man’s life, and do not charge us with innocent blood; for You, O Lord, have done as it pleased You.”   So they picked up Jonah and threw him into the sea, and the sea ceased from its raging.

Jonah 1:14–15 NKJV
Please also read Jonah 1:1–17

Rank pagans trembled while God’s prophet stood in calm stillness.  The deck pitched violently as the storm continued to rage, threatening the lives of all aboard.  To restore calm, all the sailors had to do was throw a man overboard.

Jonah, a prophet of God, had attempted to flee from his calling and assignment.  God had sent him to Nineveh (see northern Iraq) but Jonah willfully tried to sail to Tarshish (far western Mediterranean).  The storm that enveloped the ship was only a small reflection of God’s judgment and displeasure with his disobedient man.

What task has God given you?  Are you working toward your assignment or trying to run away?  Following God’s purpose will lead to calm and peace.  Sin and rebellion will generate storms and turmoil in your soul.  And the people around you may have to suffer along with you.

God’s purpose is rarely the easy way, but there is always joyous calm on His path.  His love for us is great and He wants us to experience the blessings of obedience.  And there is love in His correction.  He will patiently and lovingly discipline you as long you think it is necessary.

Father-God loved Jonah too much to let him continue in sin and disobedience.  The sailors were ready to be obedient and save the ship and their lives.  Finally, Jonah decided he was ready to throw his sin and rebellion overboard.  Are you ready for calm in your soul?

Think:      What do I need to throw overboard to restore God’s calm in my life?

Pray:         “Lord, help me throw distraction, sin and error out of my life.”

 

Copyright © January 2020, Kirk Hunt

This devotional is brought to you courtesy of CadreMen Press.  You can purchase a copy of Blessed and Blessing: Devotionals For Gospel Champions from your favorite bookseller or directly from CadreMen Press.

See With His Eyes

See With His Eyes by Kirk Hunt

Then the Philistines took him and put out his eyes, and brought him down to Gaza. They bound him with bronze fetters, and he became a grinder in the prison.   

Judges 16:21 NKJV

After all of the damage Samson had inflicted on the Philistines, they took poetic revenge.  They put out his eyes, which led him once and again, into error and sin.  Then, the burner of fields made flour for his enemies (for the rest of his life).

Walking in a circle, in the darkness, Samson had time.  Time to think.  Time to remember.  Time to get serious with God.

Mortal men or women might have left Samson alone and defenseless, in the hands of his tormentors.  God instead came close, then embraced and spoke with the man he still loved.  Despite his rebellion and disobedience, Samson remained God’s beloved son.

Samson’s eyes were not restored, but his relationship with God was healed.  Alone among his enemies, he dwelled securely in the hands of the Most High.  A good father loves all of his children, not just the well-behaved ones.  A father loves most when he disciplines his children.

Look at yourself through God’s eyes.  He sees your sin.  He sees your error.  Still, He loves you.  As you serve your sentence, He looks out for you, even when you cannot (or will not) look out for yourself.

Samson served his prison sentence with Father-God at his side.  His eyes never looked away from Samson.  His eyes will never look away from you.  Are you looking to Him?

Think:      Despite my circumstances I can have relationship with God, if I choose Him.

Pray:         “Lord, forgive my sin.  Help me to draw close to you.”

 

Copyright © January 2020, Kirk Hunt

This devotional is brought to you courtesy of CadreMen Press.  You can purchase a copy of Blessed and Blessing: Devotionals For Gospel Champions from your favorite bookseller or directly from CadreMen Press.

He Did Not Know

He Did Not Know by Kirk Hunt

And she said, “The Philistines are upon you, Samson!” So he awoke from his sleep, and said, “I will go out as before, at other times, and shake myself free!” But he did not know that the Lord had departed from him.

Judges 16:20 NKJV

Samson woke up and engaged with his enemies, but he did not know.  As a man of God, he should have known that God’s Spirit and power had left him.  His education and experiences should have told him that he was being set up, again, by a betrayer.  He ran headlong into a trap and defeat.

Samson’s humiliation (and mutilation), at a minimum, should have impossible or at least more difficult.  Instead he has become a byword for wasted potential and squandered opportunity.  A man born a Nazarite ignored his upbringing.  Intended for greatness in God, he ended humbled in prison.

Samson used God’s power and strength through God’s mercy and grace.  God is full of love and tenderness for us, but He is also a God of justice and judgment.  God eventually moves against deliberate sin and error.  Psalm 103:9 warns us: He will not always strive with us, nor will He keep His anger forever.

So God withdrew from Samson.  He allowed Samson to operate without Him.  Deliberate sin and disobedience is a way of telling God you do not need Him or you know better.  And Samson learned the truth.

We have all sinned and fallen short.  After your error, do you repent and try to do better?  Do you deliberately sin again and assume God is still with you?  You may not know the truth when you start, but you will know at the end.

Think:      Do I know the truth of how close I am to God?

Pray:         “Lord, forgive my sin.  Help me to be Your obedient child and know Your truth.”

 

Copyright © January 2020, Kirk Hunt

This devotional is brought to you courtesy of CadreMen Press.  You can purchase a copy of Blessed and Blessing: Devotionals For Gospel Champions from your favorite bookseller or directly from CadreMen Press.

Yet He Passed Away

Yet He Passed Away by Kirk Hunt

I have seen the wicked in great power,
And spreading himself like a native green tree.
Yet he passed away, and behold, he was no more;
Indeed I sought him, but he could not be found.

Psalm 37:35-36 NKJV
Please also read Psalm 37:1–40

Too often, I despair that the wicked are winning.  I have caught myself fretting that the ruthless and unscrupulous are being established, never to be dislodged.  Then, suddenly, they pass away and can not be found, even if you wanted to see them. 

I am not the first God-follower to think so.  Psalm 37, written by David, speaks to my own concerns.  The wicked may indeed prosper for a season, but not they shall not triumph.  No matter how it looks now, God’s justice is on the way.

In my own life, I have seen men and women suddenly receive justice.  Before, it seemed the wicked ones were immune to the laws of God and man.  After, I trembled at the thoroughness of God’s sovereign and merciless justice. 

On bended knee, I pray that I live in obedience to His Word and law.  I never want to be the one that God’s people cry out against.  I want always to be found, doing Kingdom work the way God wants it done.

Play it straight, since God is watching.  Follow God’s Word and law, the way you know it should be done.  His sword of justice is quick, terrible and not to be denied by mere humans.

Think:      The wicked will receive justice, sooner and more thoroughly than you think.

Pray:         “Lord, help me to be found at all times as Your obedient servant.”

 

Copyright © April 2019, Kirk Hunt

This devotional is brought to you courtesy of CadreMen Press.  You can purchase a copy of Blessed and Blessing: Devotionals For Gospel Champions from your favorite bookseller or directly from CadreMen Press.

Repent: Early And Often

Repent: Early And Often By Kirk Hunt

Or those eighteen on whom the tower in Siloam fell and killed them, do you think that they were worse sinners than all other men who dwelt in Jerusalem?   I tell you, no; but unless you repent you will all likewise perish.”

Luke 13:4–5 NKJV

We live in a fallen world where thorns and scorpions grow.  We live in a fallen society where men and women are willing to publicly repudiate God’s judgment.  All kinds of pure evil and pure accidents are possible.  When did you last repent?

Sometimes a tragedy is just a tragedy.  As Jesus Himself comments:  Were 18 folk killed by a falling building the only sinners in Jerusalem?  He did not think so.

Approximately 7,855 people die in the United States, every day.  That includes Sundays.  Are they the only sinners in America?  I do not think so.  Do you?

God’s people should live ready to meet God.  At any time, a random traffic accident or a murderous gun-wielder could send you into eternity.  Are you ready for your final judgment and reckoning?

Could every bad incident in a church house be part of a sinister conspiracy against God’s Church?  Unlikely.  Could every bad incident in a church house be a reminder to live ready to meet God?  Absolutely.

Do not be distracted or fearful.  No matter what happens, nor when it happens, or how it happens, God is still in control.  What always remains in your control is if you are ready to meet Him, face-to-Shekinah.  You are ready, right?

Think:        Am I really ready to meet God in judgment at every moment?

Pray:           “Lord, help me to live ready for Your judgment at any time.”

 

Copyright © October 2017, Kirk Hunt

This devotional is brought to you courtesy of CadreMen Press.  You can purchase a copy of Blessed and Blessing: Devotionals For Gospel Champions from your favorite bookseller or directly from CadreMen Press.

The Need For Mercy

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The Need For Mercy” By Kirk Hunt

 

So Aaron said to Moses, “Oh, my lord! Please do not lay this sin on us, in which we have done foolishly and in which we have sinned.

Numbers 12:11 NKJV
(Please read Numbers 12:1 – 10)

 

Aaron and Miriam chose to sin in public, in addition to humiliating their brother, Moses. They knew better. God decided their punishment would be public, humiliating and without mercy.

 

Aaron, the mediator for the people to God, now needed a mediator to God for himself (and his sister). The sibling squabble was now settled, or at least set aside, as Aaron begged his little brother to go to God for mercy.

 

Consider for a moment your family and other close relationships. Who needs your mercy? Whose mercy do you need? Have you not been separated long enough?

 

This was not the first time Moses had been asked to intercede with God for the erring people of Israel. Still, this time he pleaded for elite leadership. This time he pleaded for his closest kin.

 

Someone among your friends, family or yourself, needs mercy. Reach out in love. Speak in humility. Listen with grace. Take, or forget, the blame. Just get the job done.

 

You can create a miracle of reconciliation and restoration with just a little courage. Do what must be done to start the flow of life-giving mercy among you and yours. You are just a call or text away from healing and renewal.

 

Think:             I have the means and ability to give, or receive, mercy. Do I have the courage?

 

Pray:             “Lord, help me to give and receive mercy, especially regarding friends and family.”

 

 

Copyright © April 2015, Kirk Hunt

This devotional is a ministry of https://devotionals.cadremenpress.com.

Miriam’s Judgment

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Miriam’s Judgment By Kirk Hunt

 

So the anger of the Lord was aroused against them, and He departed. And when the cloud departed from above the tabernacle, suddenly Miriam became leprous, as white as snow. Then Aaron turned toward Miriam, and there she was, a leper.

Numbers 12:9–10 NKJV
(Please read Numbers 12:1 – 8)

 

The Shekinah, God’s glory cloud, departed the Tabernacle. The presence of God had left, but His judgment remained. Miriam was completely engulfed in leprosy, a slow, disfiguring and finally deadly, disease. The ancient Hebrews say it as symbolic of sin in the life of men and women.

 

As High Priest, it was Aaron’s job to diagnose lepers, then banish them from any contact with family and friends. Aaron would now have to designate his own sister as unclean and drive her out of the camp. There, on the outside of life as she knew it, Miriam would suffer disfigurement, disability and eventually death.

 

God’s judgment of Aaron and Miriam’s rebellion against Moses had been swift and final. They wanted to dwell in God’s presence, like Moses. They found out, there are more things in God’s presence than mercy and revelation. There is also justice and judgment.

 

Aaron and Miriam were right to seek God’s presence for themselves. They were wrong to seek Him in an attitude of envy and presumption. There are many things in God’s presence. His judgment is not the least part of His presence.

 

Think:             God’s presence is to be sought, but in reverence and humility.

 

Pray:               “Lord, I seek You in humility and reverence. Accept me in grace and mercy.”

 

 

Copyright © April 2015, Kirk Hunt

This devotional is a ministry of https://devotionals.cadremenpress.com.