See With His Eyes

See With His Eyes by Kirk Hunt

Then the Philistines took him and put out his eyes, and brought him down to Gaza. They bound him with bronze fetters, and he became a grinder in the prison.   

Judges 16:21 NKJV

After all of the damage Samson had inflicted on the Philistines, they took poetic revenge.  They put out his eyes, which led him once and again, into error and sin.  Then, the burner of fields made flour for his enemies (for the rest of his life).

Walking in a circle, in the darkness, Samson had time.  Time to think.  Time to remember.  Time to get serious with God.

Mortal men or women might have left Samson alone and defenseless, in the hands of his tormentors.  God instead came close, then embraced and spoke with the man he still loved.  Despite his rebellion and disobedience, Samson remained God’s beloved son.

Samson’s eyes were not restored, but his relationship with God was healed.  Alone among his enemies, he dwelled securely in the hands of the Most High.  A good father loves all of his children, not just the well-behaved ones.  A father loves most when he disciplines his children.

Look at yourself through God’s eyes.  He sees your sin.  He sees your error.  Still, He loves you.  As you serve your sentence, He looks out for you, even when you cannot (or will not) look out for yourself.

Samson served his prison sentence with Father-God at his side.  His eyes never looked away from Samson.  His eyes will never look away from you.  Are you looking to Him?

Think:      Despite my circumstances I can have relationship with God, if I choose Him.

Pray:         “Lord, forgive my sin.  Help me to draw close to you.”

 

Copyright © January 2020, Kirk Hunt

This devotional is brought to you courtesy of CadreMen Press.  You can purchase a copy of Blessed and Blessing: Devotionals For Gospel Champions from your favorite bookseller or directly from CadreMen Press.

He Did Not Know

He Did Not Know by Kirk Hunt

And she said, “The Philistines are upon you, Samson!” So he awoke from his sleep, and said, “I will go out as before, at other times, and shake myself free!” But he did not know that the Lord had departed from him.

Judges 16:20 NKJV

Samson woke up and engaged with his enemies, but he did not know.  As a man of God, he should have known that God’s Spirit and power had left him.  His education and experiences should have told him that he was being set up, again, by a betrayer.  He ran headlong into a trap and defeat.

Samson’s humiliation (and mutilation), at a minimum, should have impossible or at least more difficult.  Instead he has become a byword for wasted potential and squandered opportunity.  A man born a Nazarite ignored his upbringing.  Intended for greatness in God, he ended humbled in prison.

Samson used God’s power and strength through God’s mercy and grace.  God is full of love and tenderness for us, but He is also a God of justice and judgment.  God eventually moves against deliberate sin and error.  Psalm 103:9 warns us: He will not always strive with us, nor will He keep His anger forever.

So God withdrew from Samson.  He allowed Samson to operate without Him.  Deliberate sin and disobedience is a way of telling God you do not need Him or you know better.  And Samson learned the truth.

We have all sinned and fallen short.  After your error, do you repent and try to do better?  Do you deliberately sin again and assume God is still with you?  You may not know the truth when you start, but you will know at the end.

Think:      Do I know the truth of how close I am to God?

Pray:         “Lord, forgive my sin.  Help me to be Your obedient child and know Your truth.”

 

Copyright © January 2020, Kirk Hunt

This devotional is brought to you courtesy of CadreMen Press.  You can purchase a copy of Blessed and Blessing: Devotionals For Gospel Champions from your favorite bookseller or directly from CadreMen Press.

No Eyes, Clear Sight

No Eyes, Clear Sight By Kirk Hunt

Then the Philistines took him and put out his eyes, and brought him down to Gaza. They bound him with bronze fetters, and he became a grinder in the prison.

Judges 16:21 NKJV

The mill stones crushing the grain would have made a low, steady growl in Samson’s ears.  In weather hot and dry, or cold and wet, Samson did the work of a horse.  Or mule.  Or ass.

Either in haunting silence or with a chorus of tormentors, Samson walked his circle in darkness.  The man who had once burned Philistine grain fields now made flour for them.  I am certain the irony was not lost on Samson or his Philistine captors.

Do not be angry at the Philistines: Samson’s life had been shrouded in darkness for years.  Samson’s lust, willfulness and disobedience had long since blinded him to God’s truth and call.  The Philistines, heathen foreigners, should have been guided to God by Samson.  Instead, Samson’s lack of spiritual vision became his lack of literal vision. 

Blinded and in prison, Samson finally saw the light.  Chained to a millstone, he was free to spend time with God.  Despite all he did wrong, Samson still remembered the correct way to love God.

God had not abandoned Samson.  When Samson finally figured out his own errors, God was there.  Arms open.  Restoration was just a prayer away.

Samson is named as a hero of faith in Hebrews 11.  Despite his mistakes and errors, he returned to God.  God always faithfully restores the truly repentant.  No matter how dark it seems, you are not alone.  God is waiting, arms open, to restore you.

Think:       God is faithful and constant, even if I am not.

Pray:         “Lord, forgive me.  Lord, restore me.”

 

Copyright © October 2018, Kirk Hunt

This devotional is brought to you courtesy of CadreMen Press.  You can purchase a copy of Blessed and Blessing: Devotionals For Gospel Champions from your favorite bookseller or directly from CadreMen Press.