A Life Of Peril And Calling

A Life Of Peril And Calling by Kirk Hunt

In journeys often, in perils of waters, in perils of robbers, in perils of my own countrymen, in perils of the Gentiles, in perils in the city, in perils in the wilderness, in perils in the sea, in perils among false brethren

2 Corinthians 11:26 NKJV
Please also read 2 Corinthians 11:22-28 NKJV

The Apostle Paul could have had tenure.  He had the intelligence, education and connections to establish a Christian Academy and live comfortably.  He could have taught and published with zero risk to himself.  Instead, he lived a life of peril.

Paul lived a life of danger, risk and suffering for the Gospel.  Paul’s history, and scars, gave him tremendous credibility among the Roman legions.  Some traditions report that Paul single-handedly evangelized the Praetorian Guard, elite soldiers and body guards of the Caesars.

Personally, I find more comfort in the scarred face of a veteran than the smooth skin of an academic.  I like living proof that it can be done, or at least survived.  I feel better knowing somebody else struggled, stayed with God, and overcame the same “little problems” I face.

Your scars are a blessing.  They give you knowledge and experience you could never get any other way.  They give you credibility with people you might not otherwise effect.

For someone, your scars are comfort and reassurance.  Struggling folks often do not want to hear from someone smooth and polished.  More often, they want to hear from a survivor.  They want to hear from someone just like you.

Think:      The scars, in service for God, are really a blessing.

Pray:         “Lord, help me to faithfully persevere in Your calling on my life.”

 

Copyright © October 2019, Kirk Hunt

This devotional is brought to you courtesy of CadreMen Press.  You can purchase a copy of Blessed and Blessing: Devotionals For Gospel Champions from your favorite bookseller or directly from CadreMen Press.

The Testimony Of Scars

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The Testimony Of Scars By Kirk Hunt

 

The other disciples therefore said to him, “We have seen the Lord.”

So he said to them, “Unless I see in His hands the print [scars] of the nails, and put my finger into the print [scars] of the nails, and put my hand into His side, I will not believe.”

John 20:25 NKJV

 

Thomas wanted proof. Like the other disciples, he knew for certain Jesus had died on the Cross. Now, he wanted the same kind of certainty that Jesus again lived. He wanted to see and touch the scars of the living, breathing Jesus.

 

Enough hurt, pain and loss will rattle the confidence, or drain hope from, even those with iron wills and steel souls. Too often, the words of others mean nothing in those dark moments of distress. Only the testimony of scars can speak to those who seem to have lost everything.

 

“See? Jesus brought me through the same crisis.” “His Spirit carried me when I got the same late-night call.” “His grace healed me of the same illness.”

 

God’s people too often hide their scars. By hiding them, we also hide the evidence of God’s power and restoration in our lives. Only survivors have scars. Survivors speak with an authority that exceeds all others.

 

Thomas finally got his living proof of the resurrected Jesus. You also have proof of the resurrected Jesus. His power has brought you through. Your scars are irrefutable proof of His power and authority in the real world.

 

Think:                My scars are irrefutable proof of God’s power and supremacy in my life.

 

Pray:                   “Lord, help me to use my scars to testify of You.”

 

 

Copyright © February 2016, Kirk Hunt

This devotional is a ministry of https://devotionals.cadremenpress.com.

Paul’s Scars

“Paul’s Scars” by Kirk Hunt

Of the Jews five times received I forty stripes save one. Thrice was I beaten with rods, once was I stoned, thrice I suffered shipwreck, a night and a day I have been in the deep;

2 Corinthians 11:24-25 KJV

Jagged marks from a stoning. A latticework of lines from various whippings. The Apostle Paul must have had a large set of ugly scars.

Still, Paul’s scars served a valuable purpose. Handcuffed to soldiers of the Praetorian Guard, the roughest and toughest of Roman soldiers, Paul had instant credibility. Writing and speaking to persecuted Christians, Paul’s scars gave his message undeniable authority and inescapable comfort.

Paul’s Scars represent the good that comes from a Christian’s bad experiences. Only God would choose to turn the ugly marks of our trials into the beautiful trophies of our victories. Or should I say, God’s victories?

Look at the lines and marks of your journey. The common wisdom calls them ugly reminders. In the light of God’s purpose they are beautiful trophies. God has a purpose and plan for your scars, and you.

You may not understand why you had to go through. Just remember that God loves you. He has a plan for those using your scars as trophies.

Think:     In God’s hands and purpose, my trials become triumphs.

Pray:        “Lord, I don’t always understand, but I choose to trust You.”

Copyright © July 2009, Kirk Hunt