Take Another’s Burden

Take Another’s Burden by Kirk Hunt

Bear one another’s burdens, and so fulfill the law of Christ. For if anyone thinks himself to be something, when he is nothing, he deceives himself.

Galatians 6:2-3 NKJV

Apostle Paul is quite clear that Christians should bear, or take on, someone else’s burden from time to time. We do this as proof that we love our neighbor as ourselves. In recent days, it seems that too many of God’s people love themselves too much to bother obeying Jesus’ command.

Have you ever held a door for someone? Have you ever helped lift or carry a package? Have you ever covered your nose and mouth when you sneezed or coughed? Then you have been, in a very small way, obedient to Christ’s command, best found at Mark 12:30-31.

Of course, doing so requires you to have some measure of love, humility, grace, mercy, and self-sacrifice in your makeup. You must stop and consider the situation and condition of someone else, for a few moments, to see a need. Finally, you must sacrifice your time, money, or talent to do what needs to be done.

All because Jesus commands you. Of course, you are happy to do so, because you are an obedient son or daughter of God. Right?

Too often, we are so haughty or high-minded we fail to think of others the way Jesus would. Would Jesus refuge a refugee, punish the poor, or insist on his own rights to the injury of others? Should you?

Think: Have I taken on someone else’s burden lately?

Pray: “Lord, help me to demonstrate Your love to my neighbors.”

Copyright © August 2021, Kirk Hunt

This devotional is brought to you courtesy of CadreMen Press. You can purchase a copy of Blessed and Blessing: Devotionals For Gospel Champions from your favorite bookseller or directly from CadreMen Press.

Who Showed Mercy

Who Showed Mercy by Kirk Hunt

So which of these three do you think was neighbor to him who fell among the thieves?”
And he said, “He who showed mercy on him.”
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Then Jesus said to him, “Go and do likewise.”

Luke 10:36-37 NKJV
Please also read Luke 10:25-37

At the time of Jesus’ earthly ministry, the Samaritans and Jew hated and despised each other. They even destroyed or desecrated each others’ Temples. Still, the Samaritan had more mercy and compassion on the Jewish robbery victim than either the Jewish priest or Jewish Levite.

The sanctimonious lawyer got the point of the parable. So did everyone listening to Jesus teach at the time. Are you listening now?

The priest and Levite of the parable were expected, if not obligated, to care for their distressed countryman. Instead, a hostile foreigner saved his life. Jesus made a blunt point about the nature of compassion, mercy, salvation, and righteousness.

Good Christians should reach out past the bounds of popular exclusions and exceptions. There will probably be cost or inconvenience. You may not like your neighbor, but that does not end your Godly obligation to assist or even safeguard him or her.

Jesus’ command at Luke 10:37 is simple, “Go and do likewise.” Put aside your rights, privileges, and comfort. Look around, in your own neighborhood, for men and women who need you to stop and have compassion. Your “do likewise” is here and now.

Think: I should show mercy even at the risk of cost or inconvenience to myself.

Pray: “Lord, help me to demonstrate Your love to my neighbors.”

Copyright © August 2021, Kirk Hunt

This devotional is brought to you courtesy of CadreMen Press. You can purchase a copy of Blessed and Blessing: Devotionals For Gospel Champions from your favorite bookseller or directly from CadreMen Press.

Obey And Live

Obey And Live by Kirk Hunt

Therefore the people came to Moses, and said, “We have sinned, for we have spoken against the Lord and against you; pray to the Lord that He take away the serpents from us.” So Moses prayed for the people.

Then the Lord said to Moses, “Make a fiery serpent, and set it on a pole; and it shall be that everyone who is bitten, when he looks at it, shall live.”

Numbers 21:7-8 NKJV
Please also read Numbers 21:4-9

Not learning enough from Korah’s rebellion (Numbers 16), God’s people again spoke against God, and God’s appointed leader. Because of their disobedience and rebellion, God sent “fiery serpents” among them. The cure for the sins of God’s people was an act of submission and obedience.

Moses, at God’s direction, mounted a bronze snake on a pole. Those suffering from snakebite had a simple test: look up and live. God did not remove the serpents, but He provided a way to survive serpent bites. If the people could exercise enough obedience and submission to do as instructed.

The powerless bronze image was a symbol or focus point for a man’s or woman’s obedience and submission. A heart submitted to God would understand the need for confessing sin and obedience. A mind and soul obedient to God’s command would look up and live.

You can choose today. Hearts, obedient and submitted to God, can live. Rebellious and disobedient men and women will suffer and die. Your choices are that stark and clear.

Think: Am I willing to be submitted and obedient to God?

Pray: “Lord, I choose to be submitted and obedient to You.”

Copyright © August 2021, Kirk Hunt

This devotional is brought to you courtesy of CadreMen Press. You can purchase a copy of Blessed and Blessing: Devotionals For Gospel Champions from your favorite bookseller or directly from CadreMen Press.

Are You Persuaded?

Are You Persuaded? by Kirk Hunt

Abraham said to him, ‘They have Moses and the prophets; let them hear them.’ And he said, ‘No, father Abraham; but if one goes to them from the dead, they will repent.’ But he said to him, ‘If they do not hear Moses and the prophets, neither will they be persuaded though one rise from the dead.’

Luke 16:29-31 NKJV
Please also read Luke 16:19-31

The parable of The Rich Man and Lazarus has always haunted me. Simply put, Jesus is telling us that there are limits to grace and mercy. Those who are not persuaded will be prosecuted. It takes an overt act of mercy or grace when our holy and just God withholds justice and judgment.

Mercy is not receiving the punishment or penalties you earned. Grace is receiving gifts and benefits you do not merit. Mercy and grace suspend, or refuse, justice and judgment.

At Psalm 103:8-10, King David explained simply: God will not restrain His anger indefinitely. You can listen voluntarily now or be compelled before His judgment throne. Do the math.

Being teachable does not make a man or woman weak or gullible. We listen to wisdom, and compare it with scripture, think carefully, and pray thoroughly. Then we make a decision.

You have been exposed to Scripture and Godly teachers. Are you persuaded? When judgment and prosecution come, it will then be too late.

Think: God speaks through scripture and teachers. Are you listening?

Pray: “Lord, guide me to Your truth and make me teachable.”

Copyright © August 2021, Kirk Hunt

This devotional is brought to you courtesy of CadreMen Press. You can purchase a copy of Blessed and Blessing: Devotionals For Gospel Champions from your favorite bookseller or directly from CadreMen Press.