Faith In The Storm

Faith In The Storm by Kirk Hunt

Then He arose and rebuked the wind, and said to the sea, “Peace, be still!” And the wind ceased and there was a great calm. But He said to them, “Why are you so fearful? How is it that you have no faith?

Mark 4:39-40 NKJV

Did Jesus need to calm the storm? Since the boat was sinking, His interference in the natural course of events was welcomed by the Disciples. Still, the need or desire for God to intervene in circumstances is not an excuse to lose (or set aside) your faith.

God is God, all of the time. Not even a series of circumstances can exceed God’s sovereignty or mastery of creation. You might be in over your head, but God remains above everything. He is the final authority of all time, space and situations.

Keep and guard your faith, no matter how fierce the storm. Since God is always omniscient, omnipotent and omnipresent, your inconveniences are never an issue for Him. Your faith should be based on Him, not what is going on around you.

Jesus rebuked the storm. Then He rebuked the Disciples. Their concern about the storm was reasonable and to be expected. Their sudden loss of faith was a failure to think and act on their understanding of God and the presence of Jesus.

No matter how difficult the situation, God is your source. Keep your faith strong. The Master is more than equal to your storm.

Think: In the middle of the storm, my faith remains in God.

Pray: “Lord, help me to keep my eyes and faith on You.”

Copyright © March 2020, Kirk Hunt

This devotional is brought to you courtesy of CadreMen Press. You can purchase a copy of Blessed and Blessing: Devotionals For Gospel Champions from your favorite bookseller or directly from CadreMen Press.

In The Storm

In The Storm by Kirk Hunt

And a great windstorm arose, and the waves beat into the boat, so that it was already filling. But He was in the stern, asleep on a pillow. And they awoke Him and said to Him, “Teacher, do You not care that we are perishing?”

Mark 4:37-38 NKJV

Simon, Andrew, James, and John were not rookies, afraid of a strong breeze.    They were professional fishermen who earned good livings, with this kind of boat, on this very body of water.    They were expert, seasoned sailors and knew watercraft well.    They had all been through storms before. This storm was different.

They did not panic, at first.    They did what they knew to do.    They used their professional skills and extensive experience to weather the storm.   

They bailed water.    They shortened the sails.    They lightened the ship.    All to no avail.

The Disciples woke Jesus.    Big, burly men who, until now, had seen everything the Galilee could throw at them.    Strong, tough guys, who were way past their limits. And knew it.    They could do nothing, but they knew someone who could do anything.

In the middle of the crisis, the Disciples turned to the Master of Storms.   

Do what you know to do, but call out His Name.    Use your skills and abilities, but look to Christ for the solution.    Act, but rely on Jesus.    When we reach our limit, God’s Power begins.

The wind will howl.    The waves will crash.    Is the Master of Storms in your boat?

Think: In the middle of the storm, Jesus is my safety and comfort.

Pray: “Lord, thank You for how You protect and preserve me.”

Copyright © January 2020, Kirk Hunt

This devotional is brought to you courtesy of CadreMen Press. You can purchase a copy of Blessed and Blessing: Devotionals For Gospel Champions from your favorite bookseller or directly from CadreMen Press.

God’s Word The Second Time

God’s Word The Second Time by Kirk Hunt

Now the word of the Lord came to Jonah the second time, saying,   “Arise, go to Nineveh, that great city, and preach to it the message that I tell you.”

Jonah 3:1–2 NKJV

“Don’t make me tell you again,” is the exasperated admonition (or warning, or threat) every parent has said at least once to a beloved but recalcitrant child.  Even God’s people are more child-like than we admit.  God too often has to tell us the second (or third, or fourth) time.

At God’s command, the great fish had spit Jonah out on dry ground.  God’s prophet likely smelled like fish belly, and he may have been spitting sand out of his mouth.  .  The storm and time in the fish had the desired effect of getting Jonah’s attention.  The prophet listened when God spoke the second time.

There are reasons God has to repeat Himself to us. We can be too busy with our plans and agendas to listen to Him now.  Our daily cares, concerns, or pains drown out His voice.  Too often, our willfulness or disobedience leads us to knowingly ignore or disobey God.

God loved Jonah and patiently worked to get his attention.  Thankfully, God loves us and patiently works to get our attention. Instead of reacting to us with justice and judgment, He responds to us with mercy and grace.  God unfairly allows His children to misbehave and not pay the (full) cost they should.

Perhaps God is speaking to you the second (or third, or fourth) time. You should listen, this time.  You should be obedient, this time.  After all, God is demonstrating His great love for you, this time.

Think:       When God speaks to me I should listen and obey every time.

Pray:         “God, please help me to listen and obey every single time.”

 

Copyright © March 2020, Kirk Hunt

This devotional is brought to you courtesy of CadreMen Press.  You can purchase a copy of Blessed and Blessing: Devotionals For Gospel Champions from your favorite bookseller or directly from CadreMen Press.